Types of Fasts 

“The Normal Fast” 

“When People do not like the plain, literal meaning of something in the Bible they are tempted to spiritualize it and so rob it of its potency. Once the truth becomes nebulous it ceases to have any practical application. They have blunted its edge; it can no longer cut. In the main this is what the professing Church, and evangelicals in particular, have tended to do with the biblical teaching on fasting.”

 

“The fact still remains that to fast means not to eat!"

 

“It means abstaining from all food, solid or liquid, but not from water!"

Jesus our Example 

·        Matthew 4:2

·        Luke 4:2

 

“The Normal Fast involves abstaining from all forms of food, but not from water.”

                                          “The Absolute Fast” 

“We have a few examples in Scripture of what we have called the “Absolute Fast”, that is, abstaining from drinking as well as eating. Normally this was never for more than 3 days! The body can go long periods without food and be physically benefited, but only for a very short time without water."

 

Scripture References

     ·        Ezra 10:6

     ·        Esther 4:16

·        Deut. 9:18

·        Exod. 34:28

·        Acts 9:9

 

“The Partial Fast” 

The emphasis is on restriction of diet rather than complete abstention. The partial fast allows many variations which have been tried with blessing and benefit. There is the method of living exclusively on one type of food for the duration of the fast. Others have partially fasted by omitting a certain meal each day, thus strictly limiting the quantity of food consumed. The partial fast is of great value, especially where circumstances make it impossible or inconvenient to undertake a normal fast. Certainly it requires no less self-discipline. It can be used as a stepping stone to the normal fast by those who have never fasted before.

 

Scripture References

·        Daniel 1:9-15

·        Daniel 10:2-3

·        1 Kings 17:9-13

 

excerpts taken from the book,"God’s Chosen Fast” by Arthur Wallis